Meera Nair

An Open Letter to MP Randy Boissonnault

In Posts on November 27, 2018 at 7:35 pm

Dear Mr. Boissonnault:

I write in connection to remarks you made on November 22, during a meeting of the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage (beginning at 11:49 here). There appears to be a misunderstanding on matters relating to legitimate, unauthorized copying of copyright-protected materials. As this misunderstanding could be widespread, a few words publicly offered may alleviate such anxiety.

You expressed concern that Canadian literature is in peril, and you attributed this to unauthorized use of such literature in universities. That some publishers and writers are encountering difficulties is not in question, but the details are much more complex than was discussed. Today’s challenges stem from an accumulation of events preceding the 2012 amendment of the Copyright Act.

Nevertheless, CanLit is here to stay. On this topic, the work of Nick Mount (Professor, Department of English, University of Toronto) is invaluable, as he is respected on both sides of this debate. In Arrival: The Story of CanLit (2017), Mount details CanLit’s birth, midwifed as it was by profuse government spending during the booming post-WWII economy. As to CanLit’s trajectory: “Canada is producing many more writers and many more books than ever before … there has never been a better time to be a Canadian reader.”

History informs us that reading brings forth writing.

Returning to your remarks, you spoke highly of your studies at Oxford. You might be interested to know that Oxford is mentioned by name in the very first copyright statute: the Statute of Anne (1710). A condition for receiving copyright was that the libraries of Oxford, Cambridge, and other similar institutions, should receive a complimentary copy of the protected book, printed “upon the best paper,” apparently to survive the handling by many grubby hands. Since then, copyright law has undergone numerous changes, but the principle remains: certain measures of unauthorized use are legitimate as they serve larger social goals.

Despite this, universities are increasingly paying for all uses, through licenses with publishers. A multitude of briefs have been submitted to the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology; expenditures are given in detail and speak to the rising trend of relying more on institution-wide licenses for journals and books. Also, Michael Geist (Canada Research Chair in Internet and E-commerce Law, University of Ottawa) has just published a series on his blog which addresses this topic; for instance, see here.

If I may, there is one aspect of your remarks that I find troubling; you suggested sitting down with student leaders to ensure Canadian writers have sufficient funding. The implication is that students are responsible for the challenges endured by some Canadian writers. Nothing could be further from the truth. When students independently engage in unauthorized copying towards completion of their homework, projects, presentations etc.—that is, when they incorporate bits and pieces of text, imagery, multi-media—such copying falls within fair dealing (the principal exception within the Copyright Act, which supports learning). When guided by their teachers, content circulated likely fell within fair dealing, or, as Geist illustrates, was already paid for through an institutional license.

Moreover, a blanket fee, charged to all students, ignores the reality that many disciplines do not engage with Canadian literature, or literature of any kind. To levy such a fee on all students is, at best, inappropriate. At worst, it is unconscionable.

We are leaving our next generations with some intractable problems including climate change, ballooning healthcare costs, the need to develop new industries, and the desperate need to diversify our markets. Fortunately, there are many bright, hardworking, dedicated students, overcoming their ever present hardships, rising to meet these challenges. But even so, the political solution to a shortfall in income among writers should not be a transfer of funds from the group that is even more impoverished.

Regards,
Meera Nair, Ph.D.
Constituent and Parent

assumptions

In Posts on October 14, 2018 at 9:10 pm

As of this writing, in the ongoing review of the Copyright Act, 87 briefs have been posted by the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology. Discussion spans a variety of topics; on the volatile issue of the use of fair dealing in post-secondary institutions, there are many submissions from academic institutions, as well as Canadian writers, publishers, and representatives thereof.

Perhaps lost in that crush are students’ voices. Writing on behalf of students across the country, are two organizations: the Canadian Alliance of Student Associations (CASA) and the Undergraduates of Canadian Research-Intensive Universities. Each submission calls on the Government to leave fair dealing unchanged from its present incarnation and practice. The students are clear in their understanding of the exception—that fair dealing is not a veil for free dealing. They also appreciate that fair dealing has the capacity to reduce some of the costs of post-secondary education.

CASA’s submission reminds all that collective licensing costs attributed to post-secondary institutions will ultimately be borne by students:

Post-secondary students are directly impacted by decisions of the Copyright Board … as it is responsible for setting tariffs on copyrighted educational material. While these tariffs are billed to post-secondary institutions, they are sometimes directly passed on to students through ancillary fees … Other times, the tariff fee is paid through [the institution’s] operating budget, which constrains the institution’s ability to provide other critical resources, including updated infrastructure and quality teaching staff, to post-secondary students.

This aspect has not received as much attention as it deserves. That said, the issue of cost was raised to the Standing Committee, but only to quantify the collective license fee as equivalent to “a case of beer per student.” While this may have been an attempt to reassure the Committee that students can bear this cost, the unspoken assumption was that all students rely on excerpts (thus necessitating a fee).

In terms of how students cope with existing fees, Aran Armutlu, chairperson of the BC Federation of Students, recently had this to say:

“Assume every student is going through financial hardship.” As assumptions go, this one is more plausible.

A day later, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) issued promising news with respect to OER:

(Even though OER was still in its infancy in 2013, SPARC had issued a challenge to the educational community: to save $1 billion by 2018.)

Consider the time frame: 2013-2018. Astute Canadians will notice the overlap with the period of time from the last amendments to the Copyright Act, to the start of the present review. To be more explicit—this is part of the backdrop to the figures proffered to the Committee that illustrated declines in copyright-related income by educational publishers.

As SPARC explains, the goal was to document the savings that accrued when a “traditional textbook” (with traditional representing a proprietary, for-cost textbook) was replaced with an OER book. The regions/levels of savings are:

U.S. & Canada Higher Ed: $921,783,169
U.S. & Canada K-12: $45,051,066
International: $38,500,000
Total: $1,005,334,235

Without further details of the Higher Ed savings, we do not know how much of the nearly $922 million dollars is specific to Canadian students. Yet, a reasonable assumption would be that millions of dollars are being saved. This is relevant to any discussion concerning declines in textbook income, or declines in licensing income from excerpts of textbooks.

Committee members could also reasonably assume that post-secondary institutions are slowly, but steadily, addressing the question posed by Mr. Armutlu: “If there are other quality options that exist that help alleviate those costs, why wouldn’t you use it?” The trend to OER is likely to increase.

Granted, at this time, OER substitution is not prevalent at all levels of study across all disciplines. But, SPARC’s data should provoke at least a modicum of curiosity against the claims that fair dealing alone is responsible for the drop in income of copyright owners, and, whether reliance on excerpts applies to the entirety of the Canadian post-secondary student population.

a different perspective

In Posts on September 24, 2018 at 7:18 pm

On 12 September 2018, the Edmonton Journal published an article of mine in print and online editions, where I emphasize the role of exceptions in the growth of billion-dollar media and content industries. Below is the original, longer form, of that article.

As the summer recess ends, Members of Parliament are returning to Ottawa to resume the business of the nation, including a review of the Copyright Act. Judging from transcripts of meetings held last spring, tensions run high among stakeholders. The general dispute is one of control versus legitimate unauthorized uses, education being a particularly thorny issue.

Transcripts of similar meetings from the 1980s, 1990s, and the 2000s, reveal that relations between educational institutions and copyright owners have always been strained. Institutions cite statutes that position copyright as a means of encouraging learning, while owners swear by the rights of the author. Both perspectives have roots in history. The Anglo-American common-law tradition placed the control of copyright, with measures of unauthorized use, as integral to developing publishing sectors. Whereas the civil-law tradition led by France argued that intellectual effort was nothing less than a living part of its creator and must be protected as such.

Yet both themes were relevant on both sides of the Atlantic. Differences were only a matter of timing. Nation-states eager to build their publishing sectors favored lesser control in the name of copyright. After creative assets were amassed, those same states offered holier-than-thou pronouncements about copyright. However, in neither tradition were authors, or students, central players in the various statutes.

Despite this, the figure of the starving author is the principal exhibit during any discussion of copyright. It appeared in 1710—when copyright attained a legal persona—and returned with each copyright expansion thereafter. If, 308 years later, authors are still starving, perhaps it is time to acknowledge that copyright alone cannot assure prosperity for an author. First and foremost, an author needs readers.

For Canadian authors, this challenge is not new. Even without competitors—beginning with Charles Dickens and continuing well past Harper Lee—Canada’s population was not enough to sustain Canadian authors. Even increasing the control exerted through copyright and holding students as a captive market cannot guarantee returns to Canadian authors. Particularly as foreign educational and research-oriented publications dominate the material read in post-secondary institutions.

As MPs wrestle with this review, they might consider a different perspective concerning the system of copyright—that it is not merely about what we read, view or listen to, but how we read, view and listen. Media development is enabled not by copyright, but by exceptions to copyright. Those uncontrolled spaces, where content is unprotected, allows new media to thrive, legitimately, to the benefit of a country’s economic and creative growth.

For instance, in the early twentieth-century, player pianos were in vogue. That success is directly attributable to a copyright law that did not protect music represented and conveyed through mechanical means. According to historian Harvey Roehl, in 1923 the player piano industry produced over 347,000 pianos and achieved over $100 million in sales. (In today’s American dollars, approximately $1.5 billion.) People feared that the technology would spell the death of music, but the new market for piano rolls spurred original composition. The leading player-piano manufacturers were eager to represent popular composers, selling not only their existing works, but also music composed expressly for piano-roll distribution (George Gershwin’s tale is legendary).

Another media technology worth remembering is the video cassette recorder. American film executives fought tooth-and-nail to have it killed; but in 1984, the United States’ Supreme Court ruled that the equipment was lawful. By the 1990s, the film industry was praising the new markets made available by the technology. Consumers were eager to pay for personal copies of favorite movies, which led to increased production of new films. Drawing from data compiled by the U.S. Department of Commerce and the U.S. International Trade Commission, in 1992 earnings via direct-sale to North American consumers reached $2.5 billion and in 1993 earnings from global markets were approximately $5 billion. All this out of a technology that Jack Valenti, then-president of the Motion Pictures Association of America, had likened to the Boston Strangler a decade earlier.

With respect to contemporary technology, MPs might find U.K. research to be helpful. In 2010, then-Prime Minister David Cameron ordered a review of their intellectual property law to enhance innovation and creativity in the digital age. In the ensuing report, the lead investigator Ian Hargreaves wrote: “Could it be true that laws designed more than three centuries ago with the express purpose of creating economic incentives for innovation by protecting creators’ rights are today obstructing innovation and economic growth? The short answer is: yes.” A year later, Hargreaves explained that Cameron had been particularly interested in the role exceptions had played in the development of search engines, namely Google.

This past summer, social media were buzzing in anticipation: would Google become the first trillion-dollar company? (Strictly speaking, it would have been Alphabet, parent company of Google, who could claim that title.) Apple emerged the winner; regardless, lawmakers should not forget that Alphabet exists because of Google and employs nearly 90,000 people worldwide. Of course, billion-dollar media industries with plentiful jobs do not arise solely from flexible exceptions within the system of copyright. But such industries could not arise without them.

Opponents of exceptions will criticize any amendment that appears to favour industries over authors. MPs might find strength of resolve through the work of Nick Mount, a professor of English at the University of Toronto, who is respected by authors and educators alike. In his landmark book, Arrival—the Story of CanLit, Mount illustrates that general economic prosperity enabled CanLit to reach the success we see today, and concludes by saying Canada “is producing many more writers and many more books than ever before.”


For those interested, further reading:

James Boyle (who served as an expert adviser for the British Review) on the Hargreaves Report: “Copyright is supposed to make, not to break, markets. Yet the Review found that innovative digital businesses were strangling in the tangled web of licensing copyright has created.  As technologies have developed, copyright has created right after right to deal with them, each jealously guarded by its own collection society. Pity the poor entrepreneur who wants to create a new legal business and finds that technological happenstance means multiple rights are involved. This is good for no one (except the middle-men.)”

Stephen Advokat, A new era for Hollywood, Chicago Tribune, 3 January 1986.

Fred von Lohmann, “Fair Use as Innovation Policy,” Berkeley Technology Law Journal (2008). “This article contends that copyright law’s historical tolerance for such copying as a fair use has served as an important element of both copyright and innovation policy. This is because, to the extent it permits private copying, fair use creates incentives for technology companies to build innovative new products that enable such copying. Far from being an unfair “subsidy” from copyright owners to technology innovators, this aspect of fair use has yielded complementary technologies that enhance the value of copyrighted works.”